TEACH 'TALKING ABOUT RESERVATIONS' IN FORM TWO WITH BEST ACTIVITIES AND EXAMPLES

Welcome to Unit 8:2 

Review: Previously in Unit 8:2, we discussed about how to teach the sub topic ‘Talking about ongoing activities’ in Form One. In this sub topic, students were introduced to the various ways of expressing or talking about ongoing activities in everyday life.

In this Unit 8:2, we will learn how to teach the sub topic, Talking about reservation’ in Form Two. In this sub topic, students will be guided how to make and talk about reservations in a hotel or any other booking offices.
                                                                    
THE FOLLOWING IS THE COMPREHENSIVE TEACHING GUIDE ON THE SUB TOPIC:

A: INFORMATION OF THE TOPIC:
1. Topic: ASKING FOR SERVICES.
2. Sub Topic: Talking about reservation.
3. Periods per sub topic: 10
4: Class: Form Two.
B: HOW TO TEACH THE TOPIC:

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
The student should be able to use appropriate expressions for reservations. The students are introduced to the ways of making reservations in the local areas they live as well as in other or more advanced areas like airports and motels. A teacher here is advised to equip students with the common places they can make reservations before moving to more distant areas where the students do not live.

ACTIVITIES AND GAMES TO FACILITATE A LESSON

ACTIVITY 1: BRAINSTORMING ABOUT THE TOPIC
It's a good idea to engage students into the reality of what they are going to learn. Talking about reservation is a sub topic that can be made easy by engaging students with local areas where reservations can be made. For example, in most rural areas, common reservations are done in Bus Stands and Guest Houses. But in towns there are more reservations such as Cinemas, Concert Halls, Airports, Guest Houses, Hotels, Motels, Bus Terminals and others.

In this sub topic, it's good to talk about local but common areas of reservations such as:
Bus Stands, and
Guest Houses.

Ask students some questions on their own experiences of making reservations:
Ask students what they do when they want to travel.
Ask them what they do when they want to get a bus ticket if they have no time to go to the booking offices.
Ask them what they do when they want to take a room in a Guest House when they have not reached there.

After their responses, now you can conclude that in modern times like these, a person is expected to have tools like telephone numbers so that he/she can call and make his/her reservations.

Guide the students to discuss about the reason of making reservations. Some of the reasons of Making reservations are:
People make reservations for various reasons, some of them are:
To get the service they want.
To avoid missing the service when they arrive at a particular place.
To let them work on other matters. This is possible because they can just call wherever they are.

ACTIVITY 2: READING DIALOGUES ON MAKING RESERVATIONS.
Now after being introduced on the reasons of making reservations, students are guided to the practice of making reservations.
Provide a written dialogue to the students. In pairs or groups, students can read the dialogue provided.

Let them pay attention to the important words, phrases and sentences used. For example;
May I get a ticket Mwanza?
Can I make a booking for Friday afternoon flight?
…we can’t take any more bookings.
She will call at a restaurant and make a reservation.
I would like to travel to….
Can I get a seat in…?
There are vocabulary items that are common in making reservations. Most of them are reserve, plane, train, seat, hotel, ship, harbour, ticket, receipts, and theatre, check in, check out, confirm and the like.

DIALOGUE 1: Making Bus Ticket Reservation.

Passenger: Hello, I'm Joe.
Ticket Agent: Hello, Joe. What can I help you?
Passenger: I would like to make Advance booking in your Katavi Tour office.
Ticket Agent: Which day do you want to travel?
Passenger: It's on next Thursday.
Ticket Agent: Alright. Which seat number would you like to be reserved for you?
Passenger: Seat Number E5.
Ticket Agent: Is there anything I can help you?
Passenger: No. It's alright.
Ticket Agent: You are welcome!

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS.
Which office is a passenger is trying to book a ticket?
When does the passenger want to travel?
Which seat number passenger wants?
What is the name of the passenger?
Is the passenger assured to have what he wants?

Note: These questions will help students to understand the subject matter of the dialogue as well as how the dialogue is organised.

DIALOGUE 2: Making a Hotel Room Reservation.

Mr. Yero has gone on tour to Katavi National Park. He enters in the Lyamba Hotel and goes to the Hotel Reception
Hotel receptionist : Good afternoon, Sir. Can I help you?
Mr.Yero: Good afternoon. Can I get a room in this Hotel please?
Hotel Receptionist : Have you made an Advance booking, Sir?
Mr.Yero: No, I haven’t done any room reservation.
Hotel Receptionist: What kind of a room do you want, Sir? A double room or a single room?
Mr. Yero : A single room, please.
Hotel Receptionist: Let me see. (Looking at the register).OK sir, your room is 17.
Mr.Yero : What is the room’s price in this hotel?
Hotel Receptionist: We charge 10,000 shillings a day for a single room.
Mr. Yero: Okay. Here is the money.
Hotel Receptionist: Sir. How long do you want to stay, Sir?
Mr.Yero : Just for one night. I’m going to Katavi National Park tomorrow.
Hotel Receptionist: All right.
Mr.Yero: Thank you very much.
Hotel Receptionist: You are welcome.

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS
Choose the best responses in the brackets:
Mr. Yero is a ___________(guest of honour/tourist).
Mr. Yero wants a (double/single) ______________
Mr. Yero is going to ______________(Katavi National Part/Lyamba Hotel).
Mr. Yero _______________(has not made advance booking/has made advance booking).
Hotel Receptionist charges __________(1,000/10,000 shillings) per single room.
Mr. Yero is staying at Lyamba Hotel for _______( one night/two days)

Note: These questions will help students to understand the subject matter of the dialogue as well as how the dialogue is organised.

ACTIVITY 3: DRAMATIZING MAKING RESERVATIONS.
Students are now guided to practice making reservations in pairs. Allow them to use two common settings: Hotel Room and Bus Ticket. In each pair, one can assume the role of a Hotel receptionist and the other a visitor, or the role of ticket agent and a passenger.
Let them practice orally while you supervise them and correct them where necessary. If they get difficult, let them write correct sentences they have to say to each other.
Finally, while they are in pairs, let them write a complete dialogue of making reservation, then they should submit to you for corrections.
At the end, select the best dialogue and stick it in the classroom's board.

ACTIVITY 4: WRITING A DIALOGUE ON MAKING RESERVATION.
Guide students to write down on their exercise books the dialogues like above. Allow them to be in pairs then practice it without looking a book or on the board. After finishing writing, collect their works and mark them. After marking, choose the best making reservation dialogues and publish them on the school gazette if there is any or stick it somewhere in the class. Remember that sticking students’ works (the best ones) is a form of motivation to the students.

STRUCTURAL PRACTICE: Forms and Functions Found In the Sub Topic:
In this section of grammatical practice, a teacher guides students to the discussion of the grammar aspects that are related to the topic. In this topic, the following grammar aspects are covered:
  •   Uses of Modal Auxiliary Verbs; Can, Could, May, and Might.
  •   Uses of ‘Would like’ and ‘Would like to’.
  •   Pronunciation Practice.


USES OF MODAL AUXILIARY VERBS, CAN, COULD, MAY, AND MIGHT.

CAN
It is used to express ability, that is, to be able to do something.
Examples:
I can make a cake.
He can’t speak English.
Can you open this window?
It is also ta ask for permission:
Examples;
Can I use your room?
Can I leave now?
Can I raise the volume?

It is used to make requests or suggestions.
Examples:
Can I have more water?
You can take this pen if you like.
Can I have the bill?
You can do whatever you want.

COULD (past form of can)
It describes an ability that someone had in the past.
Examples:
I could swim when I was young.
You could see the dense forest.
They could tell you he was superhero.

It is also used in auxiliary functions to express permission politely:
Examples:
Could you please let me pass you?
Could I get you more water?
Could I take this money with me?

It is used to express possibility.
Examples:
Could it be true?
This plan could help us a lot.
You could always stay at my house.
He could ride in the expensive car.

MAY
It is used to ask for formal permission.
Examples:
May I come in?
May I ask one question?
May I say something now?
It is used to suggest something that is possible.
Examples:
She may agree with the plan.
Students may pass this exam.
It may rain today.
They may not be happy with you.

MIGHT
Might is used to suggest a smaller possibility than may does.
Examples:
He might fail exam.
She might have finished it.
I might not come tomorrow.
You might have lost it.
The shop might have been closed now.

USES OF ‘WOULD LIKE’ AND ‘WOULD LIKE TO’.

‘WOULD LIKE’
‘Would like’ is used to say politely what a person want, especially when making offers and requests. Note: ‘You’ comes in between. See examples below.
Examples:
Would you like a biscuit?
Would you like one cup of tea?

‘WOULD LIKE+TO’
It is also followed by ‘to’ (to-infinitive).
I would like a cup of coffee.
Examples:
Would you like to listen to music?
Would you like to go to the beach?
I would like to get a ticket for tomorrow.

Note: ‘Do you like’ is used to ask about preferences in general, not to make offers.
Compare the following sentences:
Do you like rice?
Would you like some rice?
The first sentence asks about likes and dislikes in general, but the second sentence expresses offers.

‘WOULD LIKE TO HAVE + -ED FORM’
This structure is used when talking about things in the past that were missed.
Examples:
I would like to have finished my school but I didn’t.
I would like to have told but no one told me.
She would like to have watched the football but she had to go out.

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE.
Teacher can guide students how to pronounce the short form of ‘would’ when it is combined with some pronouns.
Examples:
I’d like/aid/ = I would like
He’d like/hid/= he would like
A teacher should provide the proper pronunciation of these structures and other short forms in this sub topic.

6: CONNECTION: Beyond the Sub Topic. This is the sub topic that tests the students with their ability to communicate through telephone communications in order to make reservations or bookings on various places.

7: NOTE: In making reservations, students should be familiar with the ways of communicating by using telephone or short messages. These prior skills will help them when they learn this sub topic.

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Resources:

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