HOW TO "TEACH LISTENING FOR SPECIFIC INFORMATION" IN FORM THREE

Listening for Specific Information for
For FORM THREE  

UNIT: 1: 2

Learn these COMPREHENSIVE TEACHING IDEAS on

How to Teach the Sub topic, "Listening for specific information" for Form Three.


(Also: For Literature in English Subject, Check out my Literature in English Blog. Also check out My Diary for Diary Writing Inspiration and More! )

A: Information of the topic:
1. Topic: LISTENING FOR INFORMATION FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES
2. Sub Topic: Listening for specific information
3. Periods per sub topic: 32
4: Class: FORM THREE.
B: How to teach the topic:
-ACTIVITIES & GAMES TO FACILITATE A LESSON:

General Instructions & Procedures.
This Sub topic has been assigned 32 periods. Thus, it is a topic that needs more time when a teacher is teaching it. It is not the topic you bluff and say, 'Oh, I'm going to finish it in one week!". No, that is not the way it should be taught. However, you can do that if you give more activities and you are satisfied t5hat students have attained that capability of listening for specific information.

Activity 1: Listening to the text.
Instructions & Procedures
This sub topic is expected to have many activities and games if a teacher has some. A teacher may begin with common listening activities as introduced in Form Two. But he/she should keep in mind that the topic is all about 'Listening for specific information'. Thus, before preparing any activity or game on this topic, a teacher should think about what specific information he/she is going to introduce to the students.
For example, a teacher may prepare or find a text in which he/she is going to specifically test the students' ability to identify and use adverbs correctly, and the text will have adverbs in many forms. Students will have to identify them as they listen to the text. The teacher may write two columns on the blackboard or on flipchart from which students can learn how to group the kinds of adverbs they listen from the teacher. For example;
Adverbs that do not end with -ly
Adverbs that end with -ly
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Activity 2: Songs.
Instructions & Procedures
The teacher can give students verbs from a song he/she has prepared. Students can listen to the song and asked to write or order the verbs as they hear them, then the teacher gives the students the song lyrics and they can compare what they have written. A teacher should remember that this is ‘Listening for Specific Information’, thus any selected material should comply with this purpose of the sub topic. For instance, in the example above, a teacher who tests his/her students’ ability to identify verbs in the song, he/she is specifically testing whether students can identify verbs correctly and if they can identify them when they are uttered connectedly and quickly in the song.

Activity 3: Spoken or Recorded Dialogue.
Instructions & Procedures
An audio tape can work best here. A teacher may find a relevant dialogue in which he/she is going to teach a specific aspect. For example, a teacher may have the dialogue in which he/she is going to specifically test the students’ ability to identify ‘coordinators’ and ‘subordinators’, or any other language skill or aspect. The teacher may produce that dialogue in more copies and give it to the students or groups. Then, he/she can read to the students or play it on the playing device or even make the students act it out as well.
At the end, the teacher can emphasize on the learnt ‘coordinators’ and ‘subordinators’. It is good if a teacher composes his own dialogues, because it is in this way he/she can interact the text with the local environments. Instead of using the names in the text, through writing his/her own, he can put the local names, or the student names themselves.

Activity 4: Dictations.
Instructions & Procedures.
This is a dictation that should be suitable to their level, i.e. Form Three students. It is a kind of complex dictation that tests them on specific fields or aspects but make them think. For instance, the teacher dictates a sentence and the students write down the first word and the last word. Students listen again and count how many words they hear. It is a difficult challenge because of linking. The students should write down the number they think they've heard then the teacher tells them the real number. Then students listen a final time and write down key words they hear and build the sentence. In this case, the teacher may choose to read any jumbled sentence. It is good thinking exercise for the students.

Activity 5: Listening to Jumbled text.
Instructins & Procedures.
This is also a good listening activity. The teacher cut up a dialogue or read sentences without following chronological order so that the students have to order the lines of dialogue they hear, either by simply numbering the jumbled text or moving individual cut-up sentences into chronological order. A teacher may supply the jumbled sentences of a dialogue he/she is going to play, and then play this audio dialogue. The students will have to listen attentively and rearrange the dialogues they have either individually or in groups. It's good idea to use a blackboard when copies are not available or sufficient.
If a teacher doesn't have the audio file, he or she can read the written dialogue as well and the students can still to their work either by arranging sentences heard chronologically or by numbering them.

And many more activities if there are any………..

6: CONNECTION: Beyond the Sub topic. This sub topic has impacts to the learners just like others in other classes. The difference only comes to the level of simplicity and complexity that reflect the class in question. For more about skills beyond this topic, see the explanation below, CONNNECTION: Beyond the Sub Topic in Form Two, in previous article in this site.
7: NOTE: Emphasis is still the same when teaching Listening Skill for any class. More speaking activities should be given to the students in order to perfect this skill.
These activities are good for training the students to hear everything and to identify individual words.
They are challenging and students can see an improvement. You can do these kinds of activities regularly and they needn't take up a great deal of time.

Check out how to Study & Teach other Form Three Sub Topics in this Blog!

Related Topics:

Also check out:
Form I Sub topics, at FORM I SYLLABUS TOPICS REVIEW
Form II Sub topics, at FORM II SYLLABUS TOPICS REVIEW
Form IV Sub topics, at FORM IV SYLLABUS TOPICS REVIEW  

For more on Literature Topics, check out Literature in English Blog
For how to be professional keeper of your Diary in Kiswahili or English, check out My Diary

For Form IV NECTA Examination Sections, check out ELABORATED CSEE NECTA EXAMINATION SECTIONS



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