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Tuesday, 28 February 2017

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Welcome to UNIT 4:2!

Review: Previously in Unit 4:1, we discussed about how to interactively teach the sub topic, ‘Stating Directions’ in Form One. In that sub topic, we discussed how to use class settings and outdoor settings when locating various locations by either using special words or phrases or by using four points of the compass.
In this Unit 4:2, we will learn how to teach the sub topic, ‘Talking about elections’ in Form Two. In this sub topic, we will focus on engaging students on narrating what happened in elections, how elections are conducted, and how elections affect our daily lives.
                                                                    
THE FOLLOWING ARE THE COMPREHENSIVE TEACHING GUIDES ON THE SUB TOPIC:

A: INFORMATION OF THE TOPIC:
1. Topic: TALKING ABOUT EVENTS
2. Sub Topic: Talking about elections.
3. Periods per sub topic: 8
4: Class: Form Two
B: HOW TO TEACH THE SUB TOPIC:

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
The core aim of this sub topic in Form Two is to equip students with some skills on narrating what took place in a given election from school, local government to national election. In this sub topic, students are able to know the vocabulary, special terms used during election, and other procedures during election.
This is an activity that is not new to most students because election is experienced even at class level when they elect their class prefects although it’s too simple. But also they experience well-structured election at school level and at their homes. So, this lesson becomes better when students themselves are engaged in the lesson while helping them with various vocabulary, terms, and procedures of election as they are expressed in English. That is one of the focuses of the teacher in this lesson.

-ACTIVITIES & GAMES TO FACILITATE A LESSON:

Activity 1: GETTING TO KNOW THE TERMS.
This activity can be done by following the following stages:
Stage One: Brainstorming with students about elections. Start with the brainstorming, meaning and how school election, local, and national elections are conducted. Describe how important national leaders are elected and terms used in the election.

Stage Two: Discuss with them the keywords and terms used in election such as:
Civic education, voter’s education, candidate, contest, representatives, Councillor, Member of Parliament, local government, ballot, ballot paper, ballot box, voting booth, casting votes, government, Election, vote, citizenship, responsibility, nomination, nomination forms, ward, constituency, scandals, campaigns, campaign managers, rally, public meetings.

Third Stage. Narration stage. At this stage, give a short narration on any election you witnessed as a teacher. Include appropriate vocabulary in your narration so that it brings sense to the sub topic itself. Allow students to orally narrate about elections they witnessed. Make them put themselves in the real election setting and encourage them apply appropriate terms and vocabulary. In this Brainstorming time, it is good to make them talk and apply the keywords you have discussed with them before.

Activity 2: PROVIDE TEXTS ON ELECTION TO STUDENTS.

Now a teacher can provide students with texts on elections for reading. After reading such text, a teacher may have set written questions or oral questions about the text in question, then at the end after reading, they can attempt these set questions.
TEXT
Here is an example of a text on Election.
SCHOOL ELECTION DAY
Last year, we conducted election at our school. We were electing leaders for the Students’ Government. Unlike other previous elections, this election was a very tough contest because all candidates were qualified to be in the positions they were contesting for. The toughest positions were Head Prefect, Vice Head Prefect, and Secretary. Election Committee that had some teachers and students did a good job. After application, interview, and announcement of qualified candidates, the dates for start campaigns and Election Day were announced.
At Election Day, students were grouped into sections so as to make it easier for election supervisors to supply and collect the ballot papers. Students started casting their votes while election supervisors were busy making sure everything goes as planned. The election was free and fair. When all posts were voted for, all students looked nervous and restless as they waited for the results. When the results come out, some students were surprised and others cheered because the leaders they voted for had been elected.
The good thing for all students and the teachers was that the elected leaders were hardworking and cooperative. They cooperated well with their teachers and their fellow students.
Sample Questions:
  1.       What makes this election different from other elections _________________________?
  2.       What were the toughest positions: _______________ . _______________. _________?
  3.       In your own words, why some students were nervous? 
Activity 3: CONDUCT A MOCK ELECTION TO GIVE STUDENTS MORE PRACTICE.

Set a mock election in which students will participate. Tell them it is optional. No one will be forced to vote. Any result of such election will be a point of discussion. After this mock election, the discussion will be focusing on the importance of election and how election results may change or influence how people think.
Arrange The Election As Follows:
  •   At the beginning of the lesson, tell the students that there will be a mock election.
  •   Make them feel more comfortable by letting them vote for the candidates they are not in their class. Famous people like musicians and movie stars can be the candidates.
  •   Provide the ballots with the candidates’ names and a space for students to indicate their vote and their gender. Allow them to put √ sign on the candidate they want to vote for. Below is an example of the ballot paper:

1
Mzee Majuto
Male
2
Joti




  •  Place the box in a location of the room where students can vote in private.
  •  Later after counting the votes, tell the results to the students.
  •  After the result, lead a discussion with students as they respond to the following questions.

Discussion Questions.
  1.      How many boys voted for Mzee Majuto and Joti?
  2.     How many girls voted for Mzee Majuto and Joti?
  3.    What made boys and girls reach their decision? (What is in the candidate that attracted his voters).
  4.   Is there an impact when people don’t vote? (What are these impacts?).
  5.  How each vote is important in deciding the winner of any election?
  6. What is the impact of a person's decision to vote or not to vote and how the decision can affect the overall life of a particular society?
Writing Activity.
Students to write individually, in pairs or in groups on elections they witnessed.

Activity 4: ANOTHER PRACTICE ACTIVITY – ‘If I were a Member of Parliament…..’.

This is primarily speaking activity where students will be given the chance to express themselves. A teacher has to formulate a question like this: ‘If I were a Member of Parliament…….’. Here students may present what they will do when they are elected as an individual or in pairs. The teacher will tell the students that as they say what they will do, they should have appropriate finishing sentences such as I would built the bridges, I will help the old people, and so on. The students may be asked to give our four to five things they will do in that particular position.
The teacher may formulate other related questions like; ‘If I were a Member of Parliament………’, If I were the Minister…….., If I were a Prime Minister……., If I were the President…….’
Invite students to complete that sentence by telling what they would do if they were elected president of the United States. Young students may complete the sentence using just a few words. Older students can write a paragraph or an essay on the topic.

Writing Assignment.
Students think critically about the campaign issues in the current or in any election they witnessed.
Students compose a brief essay telling what they would do to solve problems in their position they are contesting for. Provide the specifications on how the essay will look like.

6: CONNECTION: Beyond the Sub Topic. This sub topic is a good beginning of other skills that will be built at the end of the sub topic. It is expected that by the end of this sub topic, students will have been equipped with the following skills:
  •   Critical thinking skills.
  •   Research skills.
  •   Speaking skills.
  •   Confidence.
  •   Listening skills.
  •   Writing skills.
  •   Civic education.
7: NOTE:  The sub topic, ‘Talking about elections’ in Form Two is an experiment that enable to students to narrate by speaking and writing on what happen to elections and  to discuss the importance of voting. There are various objectives in teaching this sub topic. Also students can learn by participating in a real process of election at their school and explain why voting is important. They also learn the potential impact of deciding not to vote.

Check out how to Study & Teach other Form Two Sub Topics in this Blog!
And many more from ‘O’ Level English Blog!

Also check how to Study & Teach the following Form One Sub Topics in this Blog!

And many more from ‘O’ Level English Blog!

You can also check the following useful links below:
FORME ONE
FORM THREE
FORM FOUR

Other Related Useful Links:


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